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chalmers206

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  • "chalmers206" started this thread

Posts: 4,122

Reg: Feb 5th 2007

Location: scotland

Children: my beatufil boy born on 22/4/10

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Thursday, July 10th 2008, 2:20pm

pese or tese?

hi all,


I was wondering if anyone knew how they decide whether or not dh needs pese or tese?. I have read the link but it still seems a bit unclear.

Dh has a blockage so i guess that would be classed as obstructive azoospermia so what ssr method would be used for this.

Any advice would be much appreciated.
2ND ES/ICSI AUG 09 = :BFP
THOMAS JOHN (TJ) BORN 22/4/10
DEC 2012 :BFP:
ONE BEAUTIFUL [zx076] SEEN 9/1/13

Jo101

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Thursday, July 10th 2008, 2:27pm

Well I think every case is different. This is what I have found for you

Percutaneous Sperm Aspiration
Percutaneous sperm aspiration (PESA) is often the first course of treatment when no sperm is found in a man’s semen, as it does not require any surgical cuts. It is a fairly short procedure, taking no more than 20 minutes to complete and requires only local anesthetic. During PESA, a needle is inserted through the scrotum into the epididymis and is used to remove the liquid inside. Because doctors are looking to collect between 10 and 20 million sperm, in some cases, multiple aspirations in one or both of the testicles are necessary. Since sperm removed from the epididymis are not fully matured yet, it is necessary to use ICSI to fertilize an egg. Men with CAVD or who have scar tissue in their vas deferens are the most suited to this procedure.

Testicular Sperm Extraction
This type of SSR is reserved for men who have a blockage in their epididymis, close to the testicles, thereby preventing sperm from entering into the epididymis. It can also be used in men who have a blockage in the testicles or produce so little sperm that none of it reaches the ejaculate. In testicular sperm extraction (TESE), immature sperm is collected through a testicular biopsy, a process that requires the removal of a small amount of testicular tissue. Local anesthetic is usually given before the surgeon makes a small incision in the testicles to remove the tissue. A similar procedure, known as testicular sperm aspiration (TESA), also removes sperm directly from the testicles. However, in this procedure, no incision is made and instead a needle is inserted directly into the testicles in order to collect the sperm. Because sperm collected from the testicles are immature, it is necessary to use ICSI in order to fertilize an egg.

Concerns with SSR
Finding success with surgical sperm retrieval depends heavily upon the SSR method you undergo. PESA has the highest rate of retrieval associated with it, at 80% to 90%, while TESE tends to be much lower, with only 60% of patients having sperm retrieved. As all of these methods require the use of IVF, and often ICSI as well, the chances of pregnancy tend to hover between 20% and 30%, again dependant upon the method of SSR used.

Another concern for many with SSR is the fact that, often, immature sperm are retrieved. Because TESE removes sperm that have never passed through the epididymis, some experts are concerned about using cells that are still evolving to achieve pregnancy. In some instances, spermatids (round cells that have yet to develop into sperm with tails) may be removed through TESE. Although spermatids can be used with ICSI to cause pregnancy, it is still thought of as an experimental treatment.

Before deciding on SSR, discuss all the pros and cons of these procedure with your fertility doctor. It is also a good idea to come up with a back-up plan in case it is not possible to remove enough sperm through SSR.

2nd IVF :BFP:

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Jo101" (Jul 10th 2008, 2:28pm)


bubble

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Thursday, July 10th 2008, 2:43pm

Hi Jo
Can you put a reference to where you found that info please?
Many thanks :smile:
x

ttc since July 06. 8 cycles of clomid. BFP on cycle 5 (Dec 07) ended in m/c at 9.5 weeks. Second BFP on cycle 8 (May 08)




Jo101

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Thursday, July 10th 2008, 3:03pm

Quoted

Originally posted by bubble
Hi Jo
Can you put a reference to where you found that info please?
Many thanks :smile:
x


Yep Bubble here you go http:
www.sharedjourney.com/drugs/ssr.html

2nd IVF :BFP:

Jo101

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Thursday, July 10th 2008, 3:06pm

Quoted

Originally posted by bubble
Hi Jo
Can you put a reference to where you found that info please?
Many thanks :smile:
x

2nd IVF :BFP:

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