You are not logged in.


Unread posts

Dear visitor, welcome to FertilityZone . If this is your first visit here, please read the Help. It explains in detail how this page works. To use all features of this page, you should consider registering. Please use the registration form, to register here or read more information about the registration process. If you are already registered, please login here.

Eeyore

TECHNICAL ADMIN

  • "Eeyore" started this thread
  • United Kingdom

Posts: 21,404

Reg: Sep 27th 2005

What's Up?
Manners are appreciated
and free to use

Thanks: 60 / 17

  • Send private message

1

Thursday, May 10th 2007, 10:47am

INFO: A ROUGH GUIDE TO CLOMID

Many couples that have difficulty conceiving through natural methods choose to undergo various fertility treatments to increase their chances of becoming pregnant. One of the most popular medications used to heighten fertility is Clomid. Used for over 30 years to help induce and regulate ovulation, Clomid is often highly successful at producing a pregnancy. If you and your partner are experiencing troubles conceiving, you may want to ask your fertility specialist about this medication.


What is Clomid?

Clomid is a fertility medication that is used to induce ovulation. Known as clomiphene citrate, the drug is sold under the brand names Clomid and Serophene, and is available throughout the United Kingdom. Specifically, Clomid works to stimulate a woman’s ovaries to mature an increased number of follicles every month. Because Clomid increases the number of mature follicles in the ovaries, the drug also increases the likelihood of ovulation and pregnancy.


How Does Clomid Work?

Clomid works by acting on a number of different receptors in the body that regulate hormone production and release. In particular, Clomid works to increase the amount of three hormones involved in the ovulation process, including:


• gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)
• luteinizing hormone (LH)
• follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)

Clomid essentially tricks the body into believing that it has lowered levels of estrogen. As a result, the brain begins to secrete increased levels of GnRH, which, in turn, stimulates the release of FSH and LH. These hormones then trigger the ovaries to begin to mature more follicles.


What is Clomid Prescribed For?

Clomid is generally prescribed for couples facing female infertility, including:


• anovulation
• PCOS
• irregular menstruation

Clomid is also used to increase the number of follicles available for IVF treatment procedures.


Taking Clomid

Clomid is taken orally on specific days of your menstrual cycle. Depending upon your fertility clinic, you may be asked to take Clomid on Days 2-6, 3-7, or Days 5-9 of your cycle. Dosages usually begin at 50 mg. Most women continue on this dosage for a cycle or two. If there is no improvement in ovulation, the dosage can be increased to a maximum of 200 mg per day.

Clomid is normally taken for a maximum of six cycles, after which use will be discontinued if it proves ineffective and another type of infertility treatment will be recommended. Occasionally, Clomid will be combined with additional hormonal medications.


Potential Clomid Side Effects

Generally, Clomid side effects are mild and not particularly troublesome. However, at higher doses you may experience:


• mood swings
• nausea and vomiting
• breast tenderness
• headache
• fatigue

30% of women using Clomid also experience changes in their cervical mucous. Cervical mucous can then become hostile to sperm, making conception difficult.


Potential Complications of Clomid

The main risk associated with Clomid use is the potential for developing Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS). OHSS can occur with the use of any type of ovulation stimulating drug. It happens when cysts begin to form on the ovaries, causing them to swell to a very large size. Typically, OHSS disappears without treatment but, without proper monitoring, the syndrome can become dangerous. Potential complications include:


• kidney problems
• liver problems
• fluid collection in the lungs and stomach
• twisting of the ovaries

It is essential that your fertility specialist monitor you for signs of OHSS while you are taking Clomid.


Clomid Success Rates

Clomid is generally a very effective drug for most women suffering from ovulatory dysfunction. In fact, between 70% and 90% of women taking Clomid begin to ovulate within the first three cycles. Additionally, 40% of couples become pregnant during the first three cycles. It is important to be aware that there is a 5% to 10% chance of multiple pregnancy (especially twin pregnancy) when taking Clomid. Speak to your fertility specialist if you are concerned about multiple pregnancy.

Eeyore

TECHNICAL ADMIN

  • "Eeyore" started this thread
  • United Kingdom

Posts: 21,404

Reg: Sep 27th 2005

What's Up?
Manners are appreciated
and free to use

Thanks: 60 / 17

  • Send private message

2

Saturday, February 9th 2008, 7:02am

UNPRESCRIBED CLOMID

Unprescribed Clomid

Thanks to the internet, it is now easier than ever for women to get their hands on Clomid. As a result, a number of women who are not experiencing fertility problems have begun using Clomid as an inexpensive way to increase their chances of conceiving twins. Although Clomid can increase the chances of conceiving multiples compared to the general population, many agree that this increase is not significant. Moreover, the use of unprescribed Clomid is both dangerous and possibly detrimental to your chances of conceiving.

Since the drug is not prescribed, health care providers cannot properly monitor their patients that are using it. Without close monitoring, it is difficult to know whether or not the Clomid is even affecting your body. Additionally, it can cause the signs of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) to go unnoticed. OHSS is a serious complication in any woman who uses fertility drugs and severe cases require immediate medical attention.

Even if OHSS does not occur, women who use Clomid but do not have any ovulation problems may actually be making their body less effective at getting pregnant. Using Clomid unnecessarily can create new problems, such as making your cervical mucus hostile to your partner’s sperm, thereby lowering your chances of successfully conceiving.

Getting Monitored
To ensure that Clomid is working as it should, and that ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome does not occur, you will require close monitoring by your fertility specialist. This will also help to determine just how well your body is responding to the clomiphene and whether or not it is necessary to increase your dosage.

Generally, most women start out on 50mg tablets. This is the minimum dosage that can be prescribed. If your body does not seem to respond to this during the first cycle, the dosage will be increased to 100mg. If your body still does not respond, your Clomid can be increased up to a maximum of 200mg, although this is not normally recommended. In some cases, it may be necessary to supplement the Clomid with another type of hormonal medication in order to stimulate ovulation.

While Clomid can be prescribed for six cycles, a few experts agree that, if a pregnancy hasn’t occurred within the first three cycles, it is unlikely to occur at all with this type of treatment alone. About 80% of women will respond and ovulate within the first three cycles, though

How it Works

Used to help regulate or induce ovulation, clomiphene assists in increasing the production of egg maturation in the ovaries. Clompihene is taken orally via a pill on days 3 to 7 or 5 to 9 of your menstrual cycle. In order to regulate your ovulation, Clomid sends a message to your pituitary gland, telling it that it needs to start or needs to secrete more FSH and LH. This increased level of hormones then signals to your ovaries that it is time to start maturing some eggs. Because of the higher level of FSH and LH in your system, your egg production and ovulation is improved thus facilitating ovulation.

In addition to helping women with ovulation problems, Clomid may also be used for women who are found to have a luteal phase defect. Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome are also likely to have Clomid prescribed. Men who have hormonal imbalances may be prescribed clomiphene in some situations. However, the use of this treatment has not been proven and the FDA has yet to approve the use of Clomid for men.

Since Clomid helps to increase the number of eggs that are produced by the follicles, this fertility medication is also often used in women who are undergoing assisted reproductive techniques and require multiple eggs to be retrieved. This is called superovulation and increases the chances of multiple births.

If you have found FertilityZone during your search for Clomid on the Intenet, we urge you NOT to buy it, but to see your GP and seek their advice. It is DANGEROUS to take Clomid without the correct supervision each month and FertilityZone take no responsibility for those who have ignored this warning, have purchased the drug themselves and then joined the site to ask questions about dosage etc.

Eeyore

TECHNICAL ADMIN

  • "Eeyore" started this thread
  • United Kingdom

Posts: 21,404

Reg: Sep 27th 2005

What's Up?
Manners are appreciated
and free to use

Thanks: 60 / 17

  • Send private message

3

Saturday, February 9th 2008, 7:17am

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING MONITORED

The main risk associated with Clomid use is the potential for developing Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS). OHSS can occur with the use of any type of ovulation stimulating drug. It happens when cysts begin to form on the ovaries, causing them to swell to a very large size. Typically, OHSS disappears without treatment but, without proper monitoring, the syndrome can become dangerous. Potential complications include:

• kidney problems
• liver problems
• fluid collection in the lungs and stomach
• twisting of the ovaries

It is essential that your fertility specialist monitor you for signs of OHSS while you are taking Clomid.

Follicular tracking is used to avoid over stimulation as well as to pinpoint ovulation. It is essetial for both the fertility team and you to have a greater understanding of your ovulatory pattern. Follicular tracking is normally performed by vaginal ultra sound scans from Day 9 of the menstrual cycle (Day 1 being the first day of bleeding). The scan will enable the follicle (fluid filled sacs which can contain an egg) in the ovary to be measured. When the follicles measure a certain size it can then be estimated when ovulation is likely to occur.

If the dose of Clomid has caused over stimulation, which can happen very quickly and can be dangerous, you will be advised not to have sex as the amount of follicles you have and the size they are at can't be controlled and to avoid a dangerous multiple pregnancy you are strongly advised to abstain.

Tracking scans is the most frequently discussed subject in the Clomid section! The bottom line is, INSIST on them so you maximise your chances of getting pg and safeguard yourself against the thread of OHSS - what is the point of just having a blood test after ovulation when it's too late?

They are available on NHS and privately, but it seems it some areas you have to ask (or insist!) on them. If Clomid is rescribed by a GP rather than a consultant, it's a struggle to get scans..but Clomid really shouldn't be taken without any aftercare, GP's may do bloods but they only tell you AFTER you have ovulated.




FERTILITYZONE



MEDHURST – PROUD HOSTS OF FERTILITYZONE